Somewhere … Over the Rainbow

By: Alan Dyer

Jun 03 2012

Tags: , , , , , ,

Category: Atmospheric Phenomena

2 Comments

Aperture:f/6.3
Focal Length:10mm
ISO:100
Shutter:1/200 sec
Camera:Canon EOS 60D

This wonderful rainbow lasted only a few minutes, as most do, shining in the brief interval when sunlight and raindrops are at their combined best.

I captured this rainbow off the back deck, on June 2, as a storm receded to the east and the Sun broke through in the west, ideal circumstances for catching a rainbow, at least photographically.

This was a classic bow, showing the inner main bow and the fainter outer secondary bow with colours reversed. The sky is bright inside the the inner bow from scattered light from the raindrops, and darker between the two bows where there is an absence of scattered light, a phenomenon called Alexander’s Dark Band after the ancient Greek astronomer who first described it.

I used a Canon 60Da and 10-22mm lens for this, at 10mm for wide-angle coverage of almost the entire rainbow.

— Alan, June 3, 2012 / © 2012 Alan Dyer

 

2 comments on “Somewhere … Over the Rainbow”

  1. Roy — Thanks! The answer to your question is that yes, it can be used for normal photography without need for drastic colour correction after the fact, as third party modified cameras require. Daytime shots look fine, with no pink cast. though some scenes that are already on the warm side (sunsets) do look redder than with a stock camera but mildly so and in a rather pleasing warmer tone. However, the Canon info sheet with the camera states “shooting normal subjects with this camera is not recommended.” That’s too strict. It is fine on normal subjects unless precise colour balance is essential. Don’t use it for commercial product photography!

  2. Very nice rainbow image Alan, and over a classic prairie landscape, the land of the big sky!
    I find the photo particularly interesting because it was taken with a Canon 60Da, a camera with greater red response than most. The colour balance in the photo appears normal (I am assuming that it was not processed after the event to reduce the red response). I commend Canon for producing the 60Da for astrophotographers, but I wish Canon would state in their advertising for the 60Da the answer to the obvious question: Can the camera be used for normal photography?


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