All-Night Satellites


ISS Pass #2 (June 4-5, 2013)

It was a marvellous night for Space Station watching.

Right now those of us at northern latitudes in North America are enjoying the opportunity to see the International Space Station come over not once but often 2 or 3 times a night, as it is now lit by the Sun all night long (on our nights down here on Earth, that is).

Here are two shots from the night of June 4-5, 2013 taken from my home in Alberta at a latitude of 51° North.

My featured image above is from the ISS pass that began at 1:55 am, and is a stack of 4 tracked 2.5-minute exposures, so the stars are not trailed, but the ground is! On this pass, the ISS came overhead. This view is looking north, toward the all-night perpetual twilight we see on the Canadian Prairies around summer solstice. There’s also a low band of green aurora on the northern horizon.

I shot the image below on the ISS’s pass one orbit earlier at 12:18 am. This image is looking south to the ISS’s high pass across the south. It’s a composite of 4 untracked 2-minute exposures –  thus the stars are now trailing in circles around Polaris at the top of the frame.

ISS Pass #1 (June 4-5, 2013)

Both shots are horizon-to-horizon all-sky views with an 8mm fish-eye lens.

The sky isn’t dark, even in the shot taken at 2 am. At this time of year around summer solstice at northern latitudes, the sky never gets astronomically dark but is lit a deep blue by sunlight still streaming over the pole and bathing the night in a glow of perpetual twilight.

– Alan, June 5, 2013 / © 2013 Alan Dyer

 

2 Replies to “All-Night Satellites”

  1. I was out this morning as well, using a Unihedron SQM at a few observing sites we use, & I saw what I thought may be the ISS overhead. I was amazed it was reflecting so bright, for a few seconds I thought it was a plane overhead. I even waited to hear engine noises, but they never came. Thank You for confirming my original thoughts that the bright object in the sky this morning, about 1:57 AM, was the ISS. It was a beautiful site to see for the first time, especially when we’re in Central Alberta, and not at JPL.Great stuff Alan. Cheers!

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