The Eclipse in Time-Lapse

By: Alan Dyer

Nov 11 2013

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Category: Eclipses & Transits, Time-Lapse Movies

5 Comments

Aperture:f/2.8
Focal Length:19mm
ISO:800
Shutter:1/59 sec
Camera:Canon EOS 5D Mark II

Here’s the Atlantic Crossing eclipse in time-lapse from the deck of the spv Star Flyer.

The above image is a still frame from the time-lapse movie I took on November 3, 2013 of the 44-second-long total eclipse of the Sun from the mid-Atlantic Ocean. It shows the first diamond ring (second contact) as totality began.

Below is the full time-lapse.

The movie is from 385 frames shot from before totality until well after. It shows just how lucky were were at seeing this eclipse, with the Sun coming out into a deep blue sky moments before totality and going back into thin cloud just as the total eclipse ends.

You’ll also appreciate the rolling of the ship, sped up here in the time-lapse, with frames taken one second apart.

Below is a still frame of the final diamond ring (third contact). Notice the difference in the brightness of the distant clouds in this image versus the one above. In the main image at top the clouds below the Sun had not yet entered the Moon’s umbral shadow.

But in the image below, the clouds are immersed in the lunar shadow and are about to be lit up again as the shadow races away from us in the direction toward the Sun.

Total Solar Eclipse - 3rd Contact Diamond Ring (Nov 3 2013)

In the time-lapse you can see the shadow enter the scene at top, then depart at the bottom of the frame below the Sun. As it shoots away from us, the shadow darkens the horizon far in the distance further down the path, bringing totality to those on the path to the east.

– Alan, November 11, 2013 / © 2013 Alan Dyer

5 comments on “The Eclipse in Time-Lapse”

  1. I like how you can see the shadow moving across the cloud tops!

  2. I shot regular HD video of the scene as well, and will at some point play with stabilizing both movies with video editing software to keep the horizon straight! For now, this is the view as we experienced it, on a rolling ship. I wish I could add the effect of the wind buffeting me and the cameras.

  3. You were *so* lucky, Alan! Great time lapse


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