The Aurora Starring Steve


"Steve," the Strange Auroral Arc (Spherical Fish-Eye Projection)

I’ve assembled a music video of time-lapse clips and still images of the fine aurora of September 27, with Steve making a cameo appearance.

The indicators this night didn’t point to a particularly great display, but the sky really performed.

The Northern Lights started low across the north, in a very active classic arc. The display then quietened.

But as it did so, and as is his wont, the isolated arc that has become known as Steve appeared across the south in a sweeping arc. The Steve arc always defines the most southerly extent of the aurora.

Steve faded, but then the main display kicked up again and began to fill the sky with a post-sub-storm display of pulsing rays and curtains shooting up to the zenith. Only real-time video can really capture the scene as the eye sees it, but the fast time-lapses I shot do a decent job of recording the effect of whole patches of sky turning on and off.

The display ended with odd pulsing arcs in the south.

Here’s the video, available in 4K resolution.

Alberta Aurora (Sept. 27, 2017) from Alan Dyer on Vimeo.

Expand to fill the screen for the best view.

Thanks for looking!

— Alan, October 7, 2017 / © 2017 Alan Dyer / AmazingSky.com 

 

Totality over the Tetons — the Music Video


Totality over Tetons Title Image

I present the final cut of my eclipse music video, from the Teton Valley, Idaho.

I’ve edited my images and videos into a music video that I hope captures some of the awe and excitement of standing in the shadow of the Moon and gazing skyward at a total eclipse.

Totality over the Tetons from Alan Dyer on Vimeo.

The video can be viewed in up to 4K resolution. Music is by the Hollywood session group and movie soundtrack masters, Audiomachine. It is used under license.

Eclipse Triumph Selfie (Wide)
Me at the 2017 total solar eclipse celebrating post-eclipse with four of the camera systems I used, for close-up stills through a telescope, for 4K video through a telephoto lens, and two wide-angle time-lapse DSLRs. A fifth camera used to take this image shot an HD video selfie.
Never before have I been able to shoot a total eclipse with so many cameras to capture the scene from wide-angles to close-ups, in stills, time-lapses, and videos, including 4K. Details on the setup are in the caption for the video on Vimeo. Click through to Vimeo.

I scouted this site north of Driggs, Idaho two years earlier, in April 2015. It was perfect for me. I could easily set up lots of gear, it had a great sightline to the Grand Tetons, and a clear horizon for the twilight effects. And I had the site almost to myself. Observing with a crowd adds lots of energy and excitement, but also distraction and stress. I had five cameras to operate. It was an eclipse experience I’ll likely never duplicate.

If you missed this eclipse, you missed the event of a lifetime. Sorry. Plain and simple.

2017 Eclipse Time Sequence Composite
A composite of the 2017 eclipse with time running from left to right, depicting the onset of totality at left, then reappearance of the Sun at right. Taken with the 4-inch telescope shown above.
If you saw the eclipse, and want to see more, then over the next few years you will have to travel far and wide, mostly to the southern hemisphere between now and 2024.

But on April 8, 2024 the umbral shadow of the Moon once again sweeps across North America, bringing a generous four minutes of totality to a narrow path from Mexico, across the U.S., and up into eastern Canada.

It will be the Great North American Eclipse. Seven years to go!

— Alan, September 2, 2017 / © 2017 Alan Dyer / www.amazingsky.com

 

Arc of the Low Summer Moon


Arc of the Summer MoonThe summer Full Moon arcs low across the southern sky, mimicking the path of the winter Sun.

This is a project I had in mind for the last month, and hoped to capture at the July Full Moon. A clear, dry, and cooperative night provide the chance.

The still images are composites of 40 images of the Moon traveling across the sky from dusk to dawn, taken at 10-minute intervals. They are layered onto a blend of background images of the 10 p.m. dusk sky (left), 2 a.m. middle-of-the-night sky (middle), and 5 a.m dawn sky (right).

As a bonus, the 10 p.m. sky shows some dark crepuscular rays in the twilight, while at 2 a.m. the Moon was in light cloud and surrounded by iridescent colours. By 5 a.m. denser clouds were moving in to obscure the Moon.

Arc of the Summer Moon

I shot the still image composite (above) and time-lapse movie (below) to illustrate the low arc of a summer Full Moon. In summer (June or July) the Full Moon sits at a similar place near the ecliptic as does the Sun in winter near the December solstice.

From the northern hemisphere the low position of the winter Sun gives us the short, cold days of winter. In summer, the similar low position of the Full Moon simply gives us a low Full Moon! But it is one that can be impressive and photogenic.

The time-lapse movie uses all 400 frames of the moving Moon superimposed onto the same background sky images, but now dissolving from one to the other.

 

The movie is 4K in resolution, though can be viewed at a smaller resolution to speed up playback if needed.


For the technically minded:

The Moon disks in the time-lapse and still composite come from a series of short 1/15-second exposures, short enough to record just the disks of the bright Moon set against a dark, underexposed sky.

I took these shots every minute, for 400 in total. They are blended into the bright background sky images using a Lighten blend mode, both in Photoshop for the still image, and in Final Cut for the movie.

The background sky images are longer exposures to record the sky colours, and stars (in the case of the 2 a.m. image). They are blended with gradient masks for the still image, but dissolved from one to the other in the time-lapse movie.

I shot the frames with a 15mm full-frame fish-eye lens and Canon 6D, with the camera not moved during the 7-hour shoot.

— Alan, July 12, 2017 / © 2017 Alan Dyer / amazingsky.com 

Northern Lights Over a Prairie Lake


Auroral Arch over a Prairie LakeThe Northern Lights dance in the solstice sky over a prairie lake. 

This was a surprise display. Forecasts called for a chance of Lights on Saturday, June 24, but I wasn’t expecting much.

Nevertheless, I headed to a nearby lake (Crawling Lake) to shoot north over the water, not of the Lights, but of noctilucent clouds, a phenomenon unique to the summer solstice sky and our latitudes here on the Canadian prairies.

Aurora and Noctilucent Clouds over Crawling Lake v2

But as the night darkened (quite late at solstice time) the aurora began to appear in the deepening twilight.

I started shooting and kept shooting over the next four hours. I took a break from the time-lapses to shoot some panoramas, such as the headline image at top, capturing the sweep of the auroral oval over the lake waters.

Aurora and Noctilucent Clouds over Crawling Lake v1

Just on the horizon you can see some noctilucent clouds (NLCs) as well – clouds so high they are lit by the Sun all night long. NLCs sit at the same height as the bottom of the auroral curtains. But they appear here lower and much farther away, which they likely were, sitting farther north than the auroral band.

Arcs of the Aurora and Milky Way
A 360° panorama of the aurora and Milky Way in the twilight sky of a summer solstice evening.

I also shot this 360° panorama (above) capturing the arc of the aurora and of the Milky Way. This is a stitch of 8 segments with a 14mm lens mounted in portrait mode.

I’ve assembled the several time-lapse sequences I shot into a short music video. Check it out on Vimeo here. Click through to the Vimeo page for more technical information on the video sequences.

As always click HD, and relax and enjoy the dancing lights over the calm waters of a prairie lake on a summer evening.

Thanks!

— Alan, June 26, 2017 / © 2017 Alan Dyer / amazingsky.com

 

Rising of the “Strawberry” Moon


The Rising Strawberry Moon of June 9, 2017 (Composite)

The Full Moon of June rose into a twilight sky over a prairie pond. 

On June 9, the clouds cleared to present an ideal sky for capturing the rising of the so-called “Strawberry Moon,” the popular name for the Full Moon of June.

The lead image is a composite of 15 frames, taken at roughly 2.5-minute intervals and stacked in Photoshop with the Lighten blend mode.

The image below is a single frame.

The Rising Strawberry Moon of June 9, 2017
The rising Full Moon of June, dubbed the “Strawberry Moon” in the media, as seen rising over a prairie pond in southern Alberta, on June 9, 2017. This is a single exposure stack, from a time-lapse sequence of 1100 frames, with images taken at two second intervals. Shot with the Canon 6D and 200mm lens.
I set up beside a small local prairie pond, to shoot the moonrise over the water. Ducks enjoyed the view and a muskrat swam by at one point.

I shot over 1100 frames, at two-second intervals to create a time-lapse of the rising Moon, as it brightened and turned from yellow-orange (not quite strawberry pink) to a bright white.

Here’s the time-lapse vignette.

Click on HD for the best view.

While the Harvest Moon gets lots of PR, as this sequence shows any Full Moon can provide a fine sight, and look yellow, due to absorption of the blue wavelengths by the atmosphere as the Moon rises, or as it sets.

However, the timing can vary from Full Moon to Full Moon. This one was ideal, with it rising right at sunset. If the Moon comes up too late, the sky might have already darkened, producing too great a difference in brightness between the Moon and background sky to be photogenic.

But what of these Moon names? How authentic are they? 

Who called this the Strawberry Moon? Native Americans? No. Or at best only one or two nations. 

Check the site at Western Washington University at http://www.wwu.edu/depts/skywise/indianmoons.html and you’ll see there were an enormous number of names in use, assuming even this listing is authentic. 

The names like “Strawberry Moon” that are popularized in the media today come from the American Farmers Almanac, and everyone – science writers and bloggers – ends up copying and pasting the same wrong, or at best misleading, information from the Almanac. 

Search for “Strawberry Moon” or “Moon names” and you’ll find the same explanation repeated verbatim and unquestioned by many writers. Alas, the Almanac is not an authoritative source – after all, they were the source of a misleading definition of Blue Moon decades ago. 

Yes, people around the world may have long had names for months and moons, but they were not necessarily the ones that make the rounds of news sites and blogs today. Most are a modern media concoction. A few years ago, pre-internet, no one knew about nor used these names. 
— Alan, June 10, 2017 / © 2017 Alan Dyer / www.amazingsky.com

Night of the Great Aurora


Great Aurora of May 27, 2017 – Wide-Angle v5

No one predicted this spectacle. But on May 27 the last-minute warnings went out to look for a fabulous show as night fell.

And what a show it was! As darkness fell the sky was lit with green curtains. After midnight the curtains converged at the zenith for that most spectacular of sky sights, a coronal burst.

Aurora over the Rothney Observatory

As the night began I was at the Rothney Observatory helping out with the public stargazing night.

ISS and Aurora - Rising out of the West

We saw the Space Station rise out of the west over the Rockies and pass through the Northern Lights.

ISS and Aurora - In the East over Rothney Observatory

It then headed off east, appearing here as the streak amid the Lights and light pollution of Calgary.

To continue to shoot the display I, too, decided to head east, to home. I should have gone west, to the mountains.

I drove through rain to get home, and missed the peak of the display, judging by images from others in the Rockies, and those to the north.

ISS Through the Aurora (May 27, 2017)

But as I got home clouds began to clear enough for a glimpse of the Space Station, on its next pass, flying overhead, again through the aurora. I wonder what the astronauts might have been seeing looking down.

Great Aurora of May 27, 2017 – Wide-Angle v3

From home, I caught another bright sub-storm outburst to the north, as the curtains suddenly exploded in brightness and rapid motion, with characteristic pink fringes at the bottoms, from nitrogen molecules.

What impressed me about this display was the smell! Yes, you see auroras and some claim to hear them. But this display is one I’ll remember for the springtime scent of lilacs in the night air as the Lights danced. 

The Great Aurora of May 27 from Alan Dyer on Vimeo.

Here is a short music video of several time-lapse sequences I shot, of the sub-storm then post-storm subsidence into the patchy flaming and flickering effect that we often see at the end of a great display. And this was certainly one of them.

We southerners were treated to the class of display you usually have to travel north the Arctic and auroral oval to see.

— Alan, May 31, 2017 / © 2017 Alan Dyer / AmazingSky.com 

 

Meet Steve, the Odd Auroral Arc


Red Auroral Arc #1 (May 10, 2015)

Stargazers in western Canada will have seen him – Steve, the odd auroral arc. 

There’s been a lot of publicity lately about an unusual form of aurora that appears as a stationary arc across the sky, isolated from the main aurora to the north. It usually just sits there – motionless, featureless, and colourless to the eye, though the camera can pick up magenta and green tints.

We often see these strange auroral arcs from western Canada.

Red Auroral Arc #3 (May 10, 2015)

In lieu of a better name, and lacking a good explanation as to their cause, these isolated arcs have become labelled simply as “Steve” by the aurora chasing community (the Alberta Aurora Chasers Facebook group) here in Alberta.

In a gathering of aurora chasers at Calgary’s Kilkenny Pub, aurora photographer extraordinaire and AAC Facebook group administrator Chris Ratzlaff suggested the name. It comes from the children’s movie Over the Hedge, where a character calls anything he doesn’t understand “Steve.” The name has stuck!

Aurora Panorama with Isolated Arc

The 270° panorama from March 2, 2017 shows Steve to the west (right) and east (left) here, and well isolated from the main aurora to the north.

Isolated Auroral Arc Overhead

This is the view of that same March 2, 2017 arc looking straight up, showing Steve’s characteristic gradient from pink at top though white, then to subtle “picket-fence” fingers of green that are usually very short-lived.

Isolated Auroral Arc #3 (Sept 2, 2016)

The view above is Steve from exactly 6 months earlier, on September 2, 2016. Same features. I get the impression we’re looking up along a very tall but thin curtain.

Isolated Auroral Arc #5 (Sept 2, 2016)

Another view of the September 2, 2016 Steve shows his classic thin curtain and gradation of colours, here looking southeast.

Isolated Auroral Arc #4 (Sept 2, 2016)

Looking southwest on September 2, 2016, Steve takes on more rippled forms. But these are very transient. Indeed, Steve rarely lasts more than 30 minutes to an hour, and might get bright for only a few minutes. But even at his brightest, he usually looks white or grey to the eye, and moves very slowly.

Auroral Arc East

Here’s a classic Steve, from October 1, 2006 – a white featureless arc even to the camera in this case.

So what is Steve?

He is often erroneously called a “proton arc,” but he isn’t. True auroral proton arcs are invisible to the eye and camera, emitting in wavelengths the eye cannot see. Proton auroras are also diffuse, not tightly confined like Steve.

Auroral Arc Overhead

Above is Steve from August 5, 2005, when he crashed the Saskatchewan Summer Star Party, appearing as a ghostly white band across the sky. But, again, the camera revealed his true colours.

Steve Auroras in 2015 from Alan Dyer on Vimeo.

Here are a couple of time-lapses from 2015 of the phenomenon, appearing as an isolated arc overhead in the sky far from the main auroral activity to the north. I shot these from my backyard in southern Alberta. In both clips the camera faces north, but takes in most of the sky with a fish-eye lens.

In the first video clip, note the east-to-west flow of structure, as in classic auroras. In the second clip, Steve is not so well-defined. Indeed, his usual magenta band appears only briefly for a minute or so. So I’m not sure this second clip does show the classic Steve arc.

The origin and nature of Steve are subjects of investigation, aided by “citizen science” contributors of photos and videos.

Local aurora researcher Dr. Eric Donovan from the University of Calgary has satellite data from the ESA Swarm mission to suggest Steve is made of intensely hot thermal currents, and not classic electrons raining down as in normal auroras. He has back-acronymed Steve to mean Strong Thermal Emission Velocity Enhancement.

Learning more about Steve will require a unique combination of professional and amateur astronomers working together.

Now that he has a name, Steve won’t be escaping our attention any longer. We’ll be looking for him!

— Alan Dyer / May 12, 2017 / © 2017 Alan Dyer/AmazingSky.com