Jasper by Starlight

By: Alan Dyer

Oct 24 2016

Tags: , , , , , ,

Category: Nightscape, Time-Lapse Movies

6 Comments

Aperture:f/2
Focal Length:20mm
ISO:6400
Shutter:25 sec
Camera:NIKON D750

The annual Dark Sky Festival in Jasper National Park ended with the best finale – dark skies, on a beautiful star-filled night. 

On Saturday night, October 22, I left the final set of science talks in the Big Tent at the heart of the Festival and headed out down the Icefields Parkway for a night of shooting Jasper by starlight.

The lead image is of the winter stars, including the Pleiades, rising above Mt. Kerkeslin at Athabasca Falls.

Pleiades and Taurus over Athabasca Falls

The Pleiades star cluster and the other stars of Taurus rising above Mount Kerkeslin at Athabasca Falls, in Jasper National Park, Alberta, October 22, 2016. The sky is brightening with the rising waning Moon off frame at left. Some cloud adds star glows and hazy patches to the sky. This is a stack of 15 exposures, mean combined to smooth noise, for the ground and one exposure for the sky. All are 25 seconds at f/2 with the Sigma 20mm Art lens and Nikon D750 at ISO 6400.

I shot the image above moments later, from the usual viewpoint overlooking the Falls, reduced to a trickle in late autumn. Illumination is solely by starlight – no artificial and glaring light painting here.

Perseus and Cassiopeia over Mt Kerkeslin

The autumn constellations of Perseus, Cassiopeia and Andromeda over Mount Kerkeslin at the Athabasca River Viewpoint on the Icefields Parkway, in Jasper National Park, Alberta. The Andromeda Galaxy is at upper right. The Pleiades are just clearing the mountain top at lower right. Thin clouds add the natural glows around the stars. Illumination is from starlight. This is a stack of 8 exposures, mean combined to smooth noise, for the ground and one exposure for the sky, all 25 seconds at f/2 with the Sigma 20mm lens and Nikon D750 at ISO 6400.

Earlier in the night, I stopped at the Athabasca River Viewpoint and shot the autumn stars of Cassiopeia, Andromeda, and Perseus above Mt. Kerkeslin. The Pleiades are just appearing above the mountain ridge.

Stars over Athabasca River

The autumn stars of the watery constellations of Capricornus, Aquarius, Piscis Austrinus, and Cetus over the Athabasca River and the peaks of the Continental Divide, from the Athabasca River Viewpoint (the “Goats and Glaciers” viewpoint) on the Icefields Parkway, Jasper National Park, Alberta. Thin cloud provides the natural glows around the stars. This is a stack of 8 exposures for the ground, mean combined to smooth noise, and one exposure for the sky, all 25 seconds at f/2 with the Sigma 20mm Art lens, and Nikon D750 at ISO 6400.

From that viewpoint I shot a scene looking south over the river and with the stars of Capricornus and Aquarius above the Divide.

Milky Way over Athabasca Pass

The Milky Way over the region of Athabasca Pass, as seen from the highway viewpoint on the Icefields Parkway, in Jasper National Park, Alberta, Oct 22, 2016. The Milky Way here is the section through Aquila, with Altair at top and Mars bright above the peaks of the Continental Divide. This is a stack of 8 exposures, mean combined to smooth noise, for the ground and one exposure for the sky, all 25 seconds at f/2 with the Sigma 20mm lens, and Nkion D750 at ISO 6400.

At the start of the night I stopped at the viewpoint for Athabasca Pass far in the distance. The summer Milky Way was setting over the pass. This historic pass was used by David Thompson in the late 1700s and early 1800s as his route into B.C. to extend the fur trade across the Divide. Thompson writes in his Journal about one particularly clear night on the pass:

“My men were not at their ease, yet when night came they admired the brilliancy of the Stars, and as one of them said, he thought he could almost touch them with his hand.”

The night ended with a display of Northern Lights over the Athabasca River. What a superb night under the stars in Jasper!

Aurora over Athabasca River

The Northern Lights over the Athabasca River in Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada, on October 22/23 at about 1:30 am. I shot this from an access point to the Athabasca River by the bridge on Highway 93 on the Icefields Parkway. Pyramid Mountain is at left near the town of Jasper. Vega is the bright star at left; the Big Dipper is at right. The image is a stack of 10 exposures for the ground, mean combined to smooth noise and to smooth the water, and one exposure for the sky and aurora. All 15 seconds at ISO 1600 at f2 with the Sigma 20mm lens and Nikon D750.

As a finale, here’s a music video collecting together still images and time-lapse movies shot this night, and on two other nights during the Dark Sky Festival, including at the big Lake Annette “Beyond the Stars” star party I spoke at.

Enjoy!

As usual, enlarge to full screen and go to HD for the best view.

Thanks!

— Alan, October 24, 2016 / © 2016 Alan Dyer / www.amazingsky.com

 

6 comments on “Jasper by Starlight”

  1. Amazing work as always! Perhaps next year we will make it to the Jasper Dark Sky Festival!

  2. Wow!!! so beautiful -thanks.

  3. Beautiful images Alan.

  4. Awesome! Thanks for sharing!

    On Mon, Oct 24, 2016 at 9:36 PM, The Amazing Sky wrote:

    > Alan Dyer posted: ” The annual Dark Sky Festival in Jasper National Park > ended with the best finale – dark skies, on a beautiful star-filled night. > On Saturday night, October 22, I left the final set of science talks in the > Big Tent at the heart of the Festival and heade” >

  5. Alan-I never get tired of viewing your spectacular photos. Thank you for sharing your special talents with us!


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